Every week, I’m wading through my email inbox and picking a newsletter to analyze. This week, it’s the New York Times Morning Briefing.  Here’s a link to an example of the newsletter..

    • What kind of outlet does this newsletter belong to? New York Times, an acclaimed newspaper with a print product
    • Who is in charge of the newsletter?  NYT Now, which is an app division of the NYT. It’s a branch focused on bringing news quickly and directly to consumers.
    • Which stories are chosen? Noteworthy stories to prepare the reader for the day. The official process for selecting stories is not evident.
    • How stories are presented in writing (blurbs? summaries? teases? bullet points? paragraphs?) They are presented as a bullet point list written in full sentences. The first section is “Here’s what you need to know,” and involves several short headlines in bullet point form that are explained in a few sentences below. After that, sections like “Business,” “Noteworthy” and “Back story” follow. They’re in all caps in bold between the stories.
    • How is multimedia used? (photos, links, gifs) There is one photo with a caption at the beginning of the newsletter and no others are used. There are links to NYT stories that further explain the points they make in the newsletter.
    • What kind of voice is used? (humorous, informative, brief, etc) The tone is serious and concise — exactly what you’d expect from a NYT newsletter.
    • How do I interact with the newsletter? (do people click or skim?) Even though the newsletter uses bullet points and avoids paragraphs, it’s still very long. I would read the bold print and skim all of the words.
    • What is the length of entire newsletter? On average, more than 1,000 words long.
    • What is the length of each mentioned story? Short ones are about 20 words long and long ones that involve backstory are more than 200 words long.
    • What varies daily about the newsletter? The content. It’s the same every weekday and doesn’t run on weekends.
    • Are there any other newsletter options at the media outlet? Tons. View the rest here. NYT offers everything from an evening edition of this same newsletter to desk newsletters to newsletters from journalists and columnists. They have newsletters specific for generations (like “the edit” which is for students and “booming” for baby boomers) as well as for partners and special offers.
    • How does the newsletter end? After the final blurb, the font switches to italics. They give credit to the writer who contributed reporting to the newsletter, explain when the newsletter is sent out and updated, offer contact information to anyone with suggestions and provide a link to sign up for the newsletter. All together, it’s 4 short sentences separated by paragraph spaces. That’s the easiest part of the whole newsletter to read.
    • When is the newsletter sent? 6 a.m. EST every weekday
    • My thoughts: This newsletter was informative, but not entertaining. I have never personally read through the entire thing until I started writing this post. I think the newsletter could benefit from a more clear division of topics, and honestly, fewer words. It’s overwhelming.